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Why Weather Changes Can Make Your Jaw Hurt


Posted on 1/20/2019 by Scott Redlinger
Why Weather Changes Can Make Your Jaw HurtEveryone looks to the old person to tell them when it is going to rain or for some other type of weather report. That person will talk about how their back hurts or that they feel something in their knee.

The question at many have is if there is some way for people to use the way their body feels to help them forecast weather changes. For people who experience pain in their jaw, the answer may surprise them.

How the Weather Affects the Jaw

Many may wonder how weather can make your jaw hurt. They understand that if you touch something hot that it can burn your skin. They may realize that if you stay out in the cold too long it can cause the temperature in your body to drop and can lead to different health issues. These are a cause and effect that people can relate to. But for some people these changes in weather magnify other issues that they already suffer from.

Cold weather can create problems for people with oral health issues. If a person is suffering from cavities, they know that eating something cold can cause pain. When the temperature drops, people with cavities can feel the change in the same way as when they eat something cold. While noticing the weather is getting colder is something people can notice without pain in their jaw, that pain is often magnified for people who have other oral health issues.

When Barometric Changes
When the barometric pressure drops, it is a sign that there is a change in the weather coming. People with TMJ are more sensitive to the changes in this type of air pressure. The amount of pain they feel because of their TMJ can increase when the barometer drops. This can serve as a warning sign that the weather is changing that people without TMJ may not notice.

It is possible for people with pain in their jaw to predict some type of weather change, but that is not always a good thing. It is a sign that there are other issues for a person to deal with including TMJ. It is better to fix those issues than it is to try to predict the weather.

Contact our office today to schedule an appointment to help with this and any other oral health issues.



Scott M. Redlinger, DMD, MD

(775) 430-5355